zet

From Liquipedia Counter-Strike Wiki
[e][h] zet
Player Information
Name:
Marcus Sundström
Birth:
June 9, 1987 (1987-06-09) (age 30)
Country:
Status:
Years Active (Player):
2002-
Approx. Total Winnings:
$67,272
History
Counter-Strike 1.6:
2002 – 2002
2002 – 2003
2003 – 2003
2003 – 2003-11-03
2004-10-03 - 2004-10-13
2004 – 2005-06-11
2005-06-15 - 2007-01-17
2007-01-13 - 2007-06-11
2007-06-11 - 2008-05-22
2008-09-05 - 2009-09-15
2009-09-20 - 2010-07-08
XXXX – XXXX
XXXX – XXXX

CSGO:

2014-09-17 – 2014-12-10

Marcus "zet" Sundström is a legendary Swedish Counter-Strike: Global Offensive player and former Counter-Strike: 1.6 player. He was wildly successful in 1.6, competing for Ninjas in Pyjamas and SK Gaming. Sundström came out of retirement briefly to play for Team Property, however the team disbanded after one of their players, emilio was VAC banned during Fragbite Masters Season 3. He is currently teamless.

About[edit]

A late comer to the top end of the Swedish scene zet made himself known to international CS fans as a key part of the SSV Lehnitz team which was able to beat the ridiculously stacked NiP team with Heaton, Potti, Hyper, SpawN, ahl and vilden at the Acon5 qualifier. As well as taking down some of the best CS players ever to plug in a mouse zet had begun to wow fans with a number of demo releases of jaw-dropping displays of skill. It was clear that if nothing else he was one of the world's best aimers. That victory also paved the way for him to join Ninjas in Pyjamas as they sought to try a new mixture of players. With the then almost entirely unknown ins also joining the team the pressure was not on zet as the least experienced of the players, he was free to entertain with his showman-like in-game skills.

His time in NiP did not start out with the same kind of high level results the core of that team had grown comfortably accustomed to. A 2nd at CPL UK and 4ths at WEG season 3 and CPL Winter showed only a glimmer of what some of the line-up was capable of. The real rise to glory came with significant additions to the team like RobbaN, tentpole and SpawN. 2006 saw the team and zet go on an impressive run which sealed their positions as one of the very best teams in the world and made them a real threat to fnatic and Pentagram. The team beat fnatic in an all-Swedish final at the WEF finals to set a standard of being one of the few teams in the world who could consistently come out on top against the fnatic team. They also won the finals of kode5 over the mighty Chinese WEG masters champions wNv Teamwork. The WCG saw zet and his countrymen getting all the way to the finals only to lose 2 maps to 1 to the emergent PGS, winning silver medals for their troubles. Lastly NiP secured a third event win for the year when they took down CPL Nordic at Dreamhack.

During that high intensity run zet managed to overshadow his fellow stars as perhaps the best player in the world and the driving force behind the victories. If his game had lacked any polish earlier in his career he was now at the peak of his powers and seemingly churning out eye-popping performances and demos left, right and center in big events. His team-mates were quick to recognize the level of play their comrade had reached and favored him over Neo or f0rest as the world's premier CS player. It says a lot that when compLexity Gaming promised to put together a dream team they took their failed attempt to recruit method as an opportunity to lure the talented young Swede over the Atlantic. compLexity Gaming GM Lake went to considerable lengths to secure zet a work visa so he could play in the newly formed CGS league, the final visa essentially being that of a specialist professional similar to David Beckham's status when he joined MLS.

After helping compLexity to become the best Source team in the world in 2007 one could be forgiven for thinking 1.6 had seen the last of zet. That proved not to be the case as his departure from the US and Source saw fans and players alike immediately abuzz with questions of if/when he'd join a major Swedish team again. His opportunity came when his ex-NiP team-mates brought him into the SK Gaming fold. That certainly seems to have been a well timed move as his skills have returned and the team recently captured their first event victory in a long time at the Intel Extreme Mastera event in Los Angeles. [1] After the succes in Los Angeles SK Gaming got a 2nd at IEM Montreal and later a first place at DreamHack Winter 2008. After a disappointing performance at the IOL Final Four 2009 where SK Gaming was eliminated in the semifinals by Begrip zet left SK Gaming.

Achievements[edit]

Date Placement Tier Tournament Team Result Prize
2009-11-28 A11st A1Premier DreamHack Winter 2009 2 : 1 $14,345.19
2008-11-29 A11st A1Premier DreamHack Winter 2008 2 : 1 $12,333.65
2008-11-08 A22nd A1Premier World Cyber Games 2008 1 : 2 $25,000
2008-10-05 A11st A1Premier IEM III Global Challenge Los Angeles 2 : 0 $25,000
2007-12-09 A11st A2Major CGS 2007 Individual Tournament 10 - 6 $25,000
2006-10-22 A22nd A1Premier World Cyber Games 2006 1 : 2 $30,000
2006-09-29 A11st A1Premier KODE5 2006 16 - 8 $25,000
2006-08-27 A11st A1Premier NGL-One Season I 2 : 1 $25,495.2
2006-08-27 A11st A2Major European Nations Champions 2006 21 - 19 $19,128.75
2006-06-20 A11st A1Premier WSVG DreamHack Summer 2006 16 - 11 $12,500
About achievementsComplete Results in any Tournament

Trivia[edit]

  • He is one of the few players to secure a P-1 Athletic Visa, and the first player who was part of CompLexity Gaming to ever secure one. The only other CompLexity Gaming member to secure one as of June 2016 is the British player, Rory "dephh" Jackson.

Media[edit]

  • "ESEA Top 100 - #4 zet". ESEA. 2008-10-11.